WWLCD?

diversityinya:

“I spent a lot of time thinking that my being Hispanic was something I had to get past in order to be successful. Sure, I was Cuban. I spoke Spanish. But it mattered more that I could shine academically. My roots were something that I kept completely separate from my idea of what success was going to be. And that’s sad. Because what I had found in life is that my culture and my roots were so entwined with my success.
I want to bring to kids this notion that who they are, the language of their families, whoever their families were in their home country, whether humble people, big-shot people—everybody’s story has value. I don’t want anybody to feel like they have to be embarrassed by their cultural heritage or it’s something that they have to get past in order to make it in this country.
They’re exactly enough. Who they are is exactly enough.”
— Author Meg Medina, “Telling the Story of You” (NEA Arts Magazine)

diversityinya:

I spent a lot of time thinking that my being Hispanic was something I had to get past in order to be successful. Sure, I was Cuban. I spoke Spanish. But it mattered more that I could shine academically. My roots were something that I kept completely separate from my idea of what success was going to be. And that’s sad. Because what I had found in life is that my culture and my roots were so entwined with my success.

I want to bring to kids this notion that who they are, the language of their families, whoever their families were in their home country, whether humble people, big-shot people—everybody’s story has value. I don’t want anybody to feel like they have to be embarrassed by their cultural heritage or it’s something that they have to get past in order to make it in this country.

They’re exactly enough. Who they are is exactly enough.”

Author Meg Medina, “Telling the Story of You” (NEA Arts Magazine)